Pony of the Americas Club, Inc. — Official Breed Website

Hunter Under Saddle

Hunter Under Saddle

A.      Ponies should be suitable to purpose and should move with long, low strides reaching 
forward with ease and smoothness, be able to lengthen stride and cover ground with relaxed, free 
flowing movement, while exhibiting correct gaits that are of the proper cadence. The quality of the 
movement and the consistency of the gaits is a major consideration. Ponies should be obedient, have 
a bright expression with alert ears, and should respond willingly to the rider with light leg and 
hand contact. Ponies should be responsive and smooth in transition. When asked to extend the trot 
or hand gallop, they should move out with the same flowing motion. The poll should be level with, 
or slightly above, the withers to allow proper impulsion behind. The head position should be 
slightly in front of, or on, the vertical.
B. This class will be judged 60% on performance and manners; 30% on type, conformation, quality and 
substance; and 10% on appointments.
C.       Ponies to be:
1.       Shown at a walk, trot and canter both ways of the ring. (Except for 9 & Under walk‐trot. 
See Rule 99.)
2.       Back easily and stand quietly. Judge may require the backing of only the finalists, at his 
discretion.
3.       Ponies may be asked to change to canter from the flat‐footed walk or trot, at the judge’s 
discretion.
4.       Reversed to the inside away from the rail, at a walk or trot only.
D.      At the discretion of the judge, all or just the finalists may be required to hand gallop 
one way of the ring. Never       more than eight ponies to hand gallop at one time. At the hand 
gallop, the judge may ask the group to halt and stand quietly on a free rein (loosened rein). Judge 
may ask for exhibitors to extend any other gait as well.
E.       Faults to be scored according to severity:
1.       Quick, short, or vertical strides.
2.       Being on the wrong lead.
3.       Breaking gait.
4.       Excessive speed.
5.       Failure to take the appropriate gait when called for.
6.       Head carried too high or too low.
7.       Over flexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the 
vertical.
8.       Excessive nosing out.
9.       Failure to maintain light contact with pony’s mouth.
10.    Stumbling.
11.    Pony appearing sullen, dull, lethargic, emaciated, drawn or overly tired.

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